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Here we’ll keep you up to date with the latest news and perspectives on topics related to SC and the upcoming conference throughout the year. Check out the tags to explore more posts on the subjects that interest you.

To Be or Not to Be—SC21 Keynote Speaker and “Father of the Internet” Unlocks the Power of HPC and Computational Humanities

In the supercomputing world, we are all familiar with the transformative impact of computational science to simulate physical and biological processes that help us address various phenomena. But the use of the massive compute power of high performance computing (HPC) goes beyond science, paving the way for discoveries across other disciplines. Vint Cerf, one of

Using Modern HPC to Engineer a Medieval Universe

In the early 13th century Robert Grosseteste composed De luce, his treatise on light, a work which arguably holds the spark of an idea that would, 796 years later, turn into the Big Bang Theory. Using techniques that were revolutionary for his time, Robert Grosseteste pulled together research to describe what he believed to be

Kicking Off SC21 TV with an Interview on Inclusivity, the Humanities, and HPC

SC21 is committed to equality, diversity, and inclusion as discussed in our first SC21 TV interview with Cristin Merritt, a program manager for Alces Flight Lt. at Oxford in Great Britain. She also highlights how HPC and the humanities in the UK are making literature, music, and design more accessible. Merritt is volunteering as Inclusivity

From Digital Humanities to Music – HPC Finds Its Footing in Wide-Ranging Disciplines

The Scope and Impact of Supercomputing Seemingly Has No Boundaries One is in the field of digital humanities, an emerging area of study that amplifies and extends humanities research through the use of such advanced information technologies as technology, media and computational methods. An academic who is striving to elevate the use of HPC within

Robot Burns: Using HPC to Create Modern-Day Poems Inspired by 18th Century Master

Two hundred and twenty five years after his death, famed Scottish poet Robert Burns continues to create masterpieces. Well, sort of. The new verses — penned in the style of the author of the acclaimed ‘Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect’ collection of poems and lyricist to “Auld Lang Syne” and other tunes — are actually

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